M5 – Personality

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M5 (Week 5) Assignment

As a current or future supervisor, you will be responsible for leading a team of employees to help achieve organizational objectives. Understanding personality and values will help you determine the best techniques to keep your team focused, motivated and effective.

What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values?  How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?

74 Comments for “M5 – Personality”

ilukulay

says:

What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values? How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?

I have a lot of takeaways from reading on personality and values. The inconsistency with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) made me realize the complexities of human personality. You can’t place an individual into a single category based on a 100 question test. The Big Five Model which talks about “the five basic dimensions that underlie and encompass most of the significant variation in human personality”, really puts the various types of personalities into relatable perspective.
Values helps us understand our behavior, attitudes and perception. In the case of generational values
even though it lacks proper research and might be way overblown, the perception is that millennials are altruistic and lack work ethic.
As a supervisor i think its imperative to improve the various traits ; persistent, attention to detail, Efficiency, analytical skills and setting high standards that are needed to be successful in business.

Stephanie Nelson

Stephanie Nelson

says:

ikukulay,
I believe what you have gathered from this chapter highlights the personalities and values pretty spot on. I too agree, how the MBTI can be so complex from just 100 questions that reveal a persons personality type.
Here’s a website where you can take the test and discover what your MBTI results are if you are interested. https://www.16personalities.com/free-personality-test
Of topic, my friend sent this URL to me two years ago and when I was reading the chapter about the MBTI, I gathered more of an understanding of why this test is available. I took the test again and I came up with the same results! I know the book mentions a professor commented that looking up your horoscope is just the same as the MBTI and faster to obtain information rather than taking the 100 questions. It does feel like reading a horoscope but it does bring more awareness for oneself.
Although, the drawback I find with the personality tests is that the test subjects a person to just one category and no in-between of introverts and extroverts. Nothing expressing the unique differences that the person brings or personality signifies.
– Stephanie

jhschnering

says:

Personality is complex in so many ways. I personally had trouble writing my blog because personality is so broad. Even the Big Five Personality Model is too broad to precisely measure personality .

There is a problem with people falling into stereotyping as well with personality traits. As you stated in your post it shows that millennials are altruistic and lack work ethic. Because we know that this is how others perceive millenials, they might fall into that stereotype.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Yes, there are certainly inconsistencies within any personality test. The idea is to get some general ideas for how a person thinks, acts, responds within certain situations. As you said, it’s never perfect.

Erin Kitchin

says:

There are indeed many complexities in the human personality. Even the most similar personalities have something a tinge different about them. That in itself goes back to hereditary and the entirety of nature vs nurture. The MBTI is actually quite an interesting test, at least the one I found online was. However, it’s still very hard to actually group everyone under only 16 personalities. For Briggs, it helps that there are only so many answers you can chose.

bherbert2

says:

The biggest take away that I learned from the chapter is all the different personalities and values individuals might have within the company and also what each personality type will look in a job setting. Along with those I learned new frameworks that are used to evaluate someone and find out what personality they have. It can be very important to understand someone’s personality as a manager. Having a great understanding of how an applicant will be like in the job setting is a major positive for a company. Using what personality the applicant has managers can determine if they will be a good fit for the company or not. Looking at the big five model which will predict how an employee will act in a real-life situation can be a critical tool. For example, conscientiousness is someone who can be reliable, responsible, and dependable. An employee with this type of personality dimension can be a great asset to the organization.

bherbert2

says:

The biggest take away that I learned from the chapter is all the different personalities and values individuals might have within the company and also what each personality type will look in a job setting. Along with those, I learned new frameworks that are used to evaluate someone and find out what personality they have. It can be very important to understand someone’s personality as a manager. Having a great understanding of how an applicant will be like in the job setting is a major positive for a company. Using what personality the applicant has managers can determine if they will be a good fit for the company or not. Looking at the big five model which will predict how an employee will act in a real-life situation can be a critical tool. For example, conscientiousness is someone who can be reliable, responsible, and dependable. An employee with this type of personality dimension can be a great asset to the organization.
When looking at how to use this as a manager I will be using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and also the Big Five Model to assess potential employees. Using these will help me decide if they can be a good fit for the company. With employees that are already apart of the company, I would also like them to take the assessment because I will be able to understand how they operate and to see if the position they are in is suitable for them or not. Every employee is different in some ways and as a manager, it is their responsibility to be able to understand the personalities and help the employees succeed within the company.

Tyler J Cline

says:

Herbert,
I would agree that their is so many personalities and learning which personality goes with what job setting helps a lot for a boss. You have to be aware of your settings and this chapter helps with learning things you wouldn’t think of right away.
Good post

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Personality plays a big part in management and how they will treat, respect their employees. Employees want respect, challenge, responsibility, motivation. These are all possible when we not only know ourselves, but when our super knows us too.

Stephanie Nelson

Stephanie Nelson

says:

My biggest take away from this chapter on personality and values is understanding the two theories of the person-job fit and person-organization fit. Personalities and values are significant for supervisors/managers to consider with their employees. For instance, if you are finding a new sale representative to bring in more customers and you have two different candidates to pick from in this scenario. One person that gets along with everyone vs one person who does hard work but lacks the communication skills. Both candidates can potentially be good for the job, but as a supervisor/manager you would want to put an employee where they can excel, everyone has strengths and weaknesses. This example of the person-job fit theory explores the characteristics of employees for the job. Whereas, person-organization evaluates the values of the employee and organization that coincide with another. An example of this is a long-term employee within the organization. The employee is hired because their values, goals, and objectives are similar to that of the companies.

As a supervisor, I would be aware of my employees strengthens and weakness and try to assign jobs that fit their characteristics. Although this theory of person-job fit will not succeed every time I would gather how to structure the work within the work environment to the best of the employee’s abilities. This leads me to new hires processes, where what they bring to the table can either determine if it can be utilized within the mission of the organization or the right person for the job.

mjwilliams10

says:

For me, the person-job fit and person-organization theories were the most interesting and useful information within the chapter. You provided good reasons as to how an understanding of these theories can be applied by managers. All of my jobs so far have been bad fits with my personality. I’m an introvert and customer service is more suited for extroverts.
It is good for prospective employees to have an understanding of their personality before applying for a job. Of course, an accurate job description for the job needs to be provided. One job I quit because the company culture did not go well with my ideas and values. I only realized it until after I was hired. This could have maybe avoided with clearer communication during my interview and orientation. I now have a better idea of what to ask during interviews.

Josh Petersen

says:

Stephanie,
You analogy is spot on. I agree it is very important for the supervisor to be able to tell who may be a better fit for the job. The supervisor must be able to analyze candidates characteristics to judge who would be the best fit for the job. Some people may have strengths and weaknesses but being able to tell which strengths and weaknesses are better to match each job is essential. I also agree that it is important to choose a person that has values that closely align with that of the organizations. It is also important to match employees in a job that they will be successful in and hopefully enjoy. This will give you a much better chance of keeping them long term as an employee for your company.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Knowing strengths and weaknesses can make or break the employee, the supervisor, the manager and the company. This is a key component of a manager’r role. Knowing how to capitalize on a employees strengths and give them the assistance they need in an area of weakness.

hjmoyle

hjmoyle

says:

The person- job fit and the person -organization fit were two the most interesting parts of the chapter for me as well. When I was hiring employees, I have had candidates that I felt wouldn’t have been a good fit for our company, but many have surprised me. I think these theories are more important for positions with higher levels of education and for places that experience a high level of turnover. I can relate to your customer service experience. An introvert trying to do an extrovert job is mentally exhausting. It is amazing how we all have read this chapter and intercepted it in all of these different ways.

ajvinzant2

says:

My biggest takeaway from this chapter wasn’t so much written, but implied. I really found the section regarding the “dark triad” interesting. The idea that even traits we typically view as negative, such as arrogance and a lack of empathy, can be positive in the workplace is a perspective I previously didn’t have. For me, it really settled in the theme of the chapter as there’s a type of person for every job, and a right job for every person.

In a supervisory roll I think that’s something I would use simply by acknowledging. I don’t particularly feel, even after reading the chapter, that personality tests are the way to go. I’ve taken quite a few in my time, and as also suggested in the text, never seem to get the same result. I think that conversation is probably a better way to interview. Generally, you can get a rough idea of personality just from idle chat, and not necessarily just what’s said, but also body language, eye contact, etc. I do think that given the takeaway here I might be less prone to throw my own values into the evaluation though by dismissing someone who may possess traits I feel aren’t’ “good,” and rather evaluate that from the perspective of the needs of the job.

sstetzinger

sstetzinger

says:

I share many of your feelings regarding this chapter. Reading that some of the traits I think of as negative have their own place in the workplace was a good reminder that when hiring we should not look for a single type of person, especially if the roles we are looking to fill vary. Just because I may not prefer a coworker’s personality and values as a friend, it does not mean that they are wrong for the position. I like your point about getting to know someone in an interview rather than through personality tests because, like you said, an individual’s results can vary. I want to give my candidates the opportunity I would want for myself: a chance to show that I can be a good fit for the position in person, rather than being disqualified almost automatically because of personality test results.

clsmith24

says:

I think it was a great way to summarize the chapter by saying the theme that you got from it being; there’s a person for every job and a right job for every person. Many people love being able to have a relaxed work environment like that of an office job, while others prefer a more interactive, quick-pace job. Everyone finding their niche in the type of work they prefer is what helps promote businesses and therefore economic growth.
I also like the aspect of getting what would be beneficial in having a personality test, by conversing in the interview. You can’t really know someone by taking personality tests and studies show that popular personality tests like the Meyers-Briggs don’t take into account emotional thoughts and behaviors. Thoughts and behaviors are some of the main ways a person’s personality is defined!

Jami

says:

What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values? How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?
My biggest take away from this chapter was the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the Big Five Personality Model and Hofstedes Framework. I did not know that there was so many different personalities and values. In my personal opinion, I didn’t realize the personality trait to match the actual job. The way it can be broken down in detail and categorized, I was wondering now about myself and what my outcomes are if I look into it for myself. I also thought that the Dark Triad was really cool. I don’t think my brain has thought this way, at least that I know of. I think that I will take it in high consideration if I ever have to use it in that sort of position.

kveech2

kveech2

says:

Learning about the different personality types and how they can strive in certain jobs was definitely my favorite part of this chapter and I think that it is a very important thing for a manager or supervisor to consider when delegating tasks and hiring people for jobs. By using peoples strengths it will allow for a more productive team. I also think that it’s very important for each person to know their own personality types so that they can choose jobs that they are happy in because the job comes easily to them and they don’t mind the work.

ilukulay

says:

It was a very informative chapter. Learning about the complexities of personalities was an eye opener and very educative. The limitation of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator proves how complex human personalities can be. As you stated i didn’t also know about how personality matches job type. It was a very interesting concept.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

It seems many took away that personality tests can help with management, teamwork and work structure. These are all good points.

mjwilliams10

says:

My biggest take away is understanding that personality, traits, and values all influence the behavior of individuals within an organization and that this knowledge can be used to improve management of employees. Depending on my organization and the job position needing to be filled, I would screen candidates for a particular trait like conscientiousness to find a good fit. I would also disqualify candidates based on negative traits like narcissism. As the textbook suggests, MBTI is not very reliable but can be used for helping employees understand each other and open communication. As a supervisor, I would evaluate my organization’s values and job positions to determine the best personality fit for hiring. I would also observe employee behavior to see if employees’ personality strengths are being utilized. If I work for a global organization, I would take into consideration cultural values to create great work environment.

negentzwilkins

says:

mjwilliams10, I thought your comment was interesting in that you would disqualify a candidate based on a negative trait like narcissism – I wonder if at some point in our culture that could be considered personality discrimination…? I hadn’t really ever thought about not considering a candidate based on their results of a personality test, however the hiring staff has emotional intelligence a candidates personality usually shines through on paper and in conjunction with an in person interview.

Although MBTI may not be very reliable it can be helpful tool. I have taken the MBTI several times and I usually end up with similar scores. The results vary most if I am taking the test and answering the questions according to my work self, or my own self. I find that some questions may be answered differently depending on what the overall expectation is. Again, although not always reliable, there is sometime enough knowledge/awareness gained to be able to enhance the work relationship.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Personality and attitude does impact employees. Employees impact culture and companies. Companies impact consumers.

Joshua Counts

says:

I believe my biggest take away from this chapter is the Trait Activation Theory (TAT) in reference to the different jobs that scored high and low in reference to behavior. I noticed there were no first responders listed in this. Even in other personality and values theories and tests, first responders are not listed.

As a supervisor in public safety, it is important to acknowledge that first responders fit in every aspect of these personality traits. Most responders chose to work on the streets because they like a diverse workday, one that is dynamic and challenging. A police officer must be detailed oriented during searches or crime scenes to find the key evidence to make their case. They must be good at dealing with angry people because he or she will have to settle arguments and fights so that both parties think they won. A firefighter must work well under time pressure as someone’s house is burning because if they are feeling like they are having a slow day, someone dies. They must have innovation because during car accidents they have to figure out how to stabilize a vehicle they have never touched or gain access to a patient in a building or area they have never seen without the tools they normally use. A paramedic must have social skills because they have to be a shoulder to cry on for someone who lost a loved one. They must have a competitive work ethic to get the job done right and better than the first time because they care for their patients and want the best for them. Even though I have given examples of traits for certain positions, they could all fit each trait. Yet, they could be a type A or type B personality at the same time. Supervisors to first responders should acknowledge that the way each of their members thinks is as diverse as their job description.

negentzwilkins

says:

Joshua, your insight as to the different strengths in varying first responders roles is very enlightening. Your last sentence caught my attention. You noted that “Supervisors to first responders should acknowledge that the way each of their members thinks is as diverse as their job description.” I’ve been a supervisor for teams of different backgrounds for many years and many times our job roles can be “save the day” intense. However, it isn’t “save a life” intensity. I think that a supervisor to first responders must be very stressful, and to be a good supervisor/leader, they should have a good connection with their workers in addition to a foundation of trust and strong communication. I wonder how first responders use personality tests such as MBTI to their advantage when setting up their work strategy.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Thanks for sharing and it’s so true. Personalities are so diverse as are jobs, employees and individuals on the street that one comes into contact with.

Alan

Alan

says:

My biggest takeaway from this chapter is that no single set of personality traits can be used for every situation. Personality, a deep-level diversity characteristic, is one of the most important aspects of a productive organization. Different personalities will always be in the workplace and managers and leaders need to learn to regulate this dynamic.

Emotional Intelligence is the key for success for future managers and leaders. Understanding and recognizing different personalities during hiring processes will create a healthy working environment right out of the gate. Knowing your employees and assigning tasks to group with complementary personalities will benefit you as the manager, your employees, and the company itself.

bbell19

bbell19

says:

I have been aware of an abundance of material covered in this chapter from on-site mentorship, having taken personality tests, and by taking classes revolving around individual responses to varying external hardships, however what most intrigued me from the new material was that of the Situation Strength Theory (SST). I believe in nuture over nature, the environment in which you are conditioned helps to shape you as a person. I find this notion is parralled in the SST, a more strict and rigid environment will not allow an individual to be expressive and therefore that person will not develop tools necessary to branch out of their current position. Just as with a tough parental figure who provides the utmost clarty on what is expected and deals out punishment to uphold those values, a supervisor who does not allow for deviation from the guidelines will most likely not be privy to their coworkers’ true behaviors. I believe that in a supervisory role it important to have trust in those you are directing. Trust must be earned and that can not take place unless the supervisor is willing to be more lenient and flexible. Although it is very easy to maintain control and order in a strong situation, it is not good business sense to plan everyday as if real world problems are not an eventuality. Although I agree that businesses must take a strong stance on core issues such as a no tolerance policy on sexual harassment, I find that smaller incidentals such as dress code can be more free, within reason, so that individuals may make subtle personal statements about their personalities. By attaining a good balance between srtict guidlines and a more realxed setting employees will feel better euipped to repond to weaker situations, for instance irate customers.

Joshua Counts

says:

Hello! What king of supervisor do you think you would be? I learned there is a lot of responsibilty to being a supervisor. It seems most people I know become a supervisor for the pay and that shouldn’t be why. Being a supervisor is a lot of responsibility. To me, it is not worth doing for the pay.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Reputation will begin the moment you take the role of supervisor. You will either build trust and thereby loyalty, or you will alienate employees and it will be hard to get them back. Knowing their personality can be very helpful and let you help them be successful.

sstetzinger

sstetzinger

says:

My biggest takeaway from this chapter on personality and values is the clarity I gained from understanding situation strength theory. Situation strength is “the degree to which norms, cues, or standards dictate appropriate behavior” (Organizational Behavior, 149). Through this chapter I learned that clarity, consistency, constraints, and consequences all factor into situation strength. By increasing these and strengthening the situation, employees will better understand appropriate behavior and be compelled to exhibit it (Organizational Behavior, 149). As a supervisor in the future, I will consider whether or not I will need to create a strong or weak situation based on the task at hand. In my line of work, most tasks need to be completed following a specific set of guidelines and, although it may feel taboo to admit, it can be better if personalities do not dominate the situation. Fortunately, most employees in my field recognize this and derive satisfaction from the circumstances at hand rather than from infusing creativity into the moment and are therefore still comfortable in a “strong situation.” When situations do not require following specific steps and creativity from differing personalities can be beneficial, such as when brainstorming new community outreach initiatives, I will create a weak situation to foster this environment.

abconstable

says:

I think you did a great job at summarizing and giving personal examples while explaining the situation strength theory. It sounds like you have a thorough understanding this based off of personal experience and I think that’ll be a great attribute for you if you become a supervisor. I see what you mean when you say sometimes it’s best when personalities don’t dominate a situation. Especially at times when working on a strict project that just needs to be done based off guidelines rather than creativity. In this instance, I definitely agree with you; however, creativity is really beneficial when coming up with ideas.

kaariola

says:

What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values? How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?

My biggest take away from this chapter on personality and values is the diversity of personalities the workplace can potentially hold. As a supervisor it’s important to know the types of personalities that are around the workplace. Knowing this information can benefit the workplace depending on how you use the personalities to achieve goals at work. An example of how to effectively apply a personality trait to a work environment is by putting an employee in a situation where they can be highly effective. An example of this is putting an employee who scores high in openness in a leadership position, because open personalities tend to be more open to suggestions, more adaptable to change, and are more comfortable with ambiguity. (Organizational Behavior, 143).

In the future I think it’ll benefit not only myself but the workplace as well to take the time to have employees take a personality test to find strengths for the workplace. At my current job, employees have taken a strength test to find out what top 5 strengths each individual has. So far it seems to have helped out because employees have learned about themselves as well as other around the workplace. It seemed like a silly idea at first but it seems to have benefited the workplace because most people know who to go to when they need help with a certain task at work. This is something I’d like to adopt in the future as a supervisor or manager.

dafausnaugh

dafausnaugh

says:

I have taken several of these tests and they always seem silly until I end up learning something new about myself and my coworkers. My best memory was having to take the test at work and customers would even respond with what they truly thought of us. This made it more interesting because it gave us different results then we expected which led us to learn more about ourselves. I believe this is a good thing to stick out in the chapter and I am happy to see that a potentially future supervisor plans to try and use this technique as well. Thank you for the great post.

Alden

Alden

says:

My biggest takeaway from the chapter on Personality and Values is the Situation Strength Theory. This stood out to me the most because it made sense. People react in different ways regarding what is happening around them all the time. Like the book states, “Strong situations show us what the right behavior is, pressure us to exhibit it, and discourage the wrong behavior. In weak situations, conversely, “anything goes,” and thus we are freer to express our personality in behavior.” This is important knowledge as a supervisor because knowing your employees is key. For example, being in one of the strong situations can cause almost everyone to hold their personality back, and knowing this can help a supervisor understand that the employees might be feeling differently about what is going on. Also being able to detect issues based on attitude would make things easier for the supervisor to understand what might need adjusting and what could be adopted to better fit their employees. In other words, by understanding that not everyone is acting as they normally would, a supervisor can start to understand a little more about what their employees are actually feeling.

dafausnaugh

dafausnaugh

says:

This is another good thing to take away from the chapter and for the exact reason you would include it in your future supervision techniques. I believe that trying to understand how someone is feeling can greatly influence their work as it can make them feel important and if someone will truly listen. Thank you for the great post.

alhansen6

says:

Alden, you brought up some interesting points that are very true. I agree with you how in strong situations people will hold back their true response compared to weak situations. As this is the case almost all of the time, this gives a supervisor a false observation as they don’t see their employees true response and reaction. To me, it is a tricky topic as I feel like it would be hard to evaluate an employees true response if they didn’t even notice or see. As people, showing true emotions seems to be a hard thing to do.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

How would this theory be applied to the mob mentality that seems to be at every part of the country? Are those weak situations where anything goes to seek your own way?

dafausnaugh

dafausnaugh

says:

There are several things that I have taken from this chapter but the top three are the several personality tests that can be completed, the work values between the different generations, and Holland’s Personality-Job Fit Theory. These three all combine for important information, which is why it is my biggest take away. Yes, all the information is relevant, but for some reason these three things stood out to me. First, I have had to take a personality test at almost every job I have worked, and it is often the same result for me. I have even had to take the tests in some of my classes because the professor wanted to show us how it would affect our perception of ourselves. Second and third king of go together in my opinion as the different generations are constantly growing and changing their values it will change where exactly they sit on the Personality-Job Fit Theory.
Again, all information that I find to be important and I want to incorporate it into my future supervising techniques. I want to be able to understand the changing values and determine a job that fits the changing person if they remain loyal and work with the company. We know that satisfied workers often result in better productivity, which is why I want to make sure that their values are being met.

bbell19

bbell19

says:

I agree that there is value in testing employees for their personality traits before hiring, coworkers tend to become more like family to us with the amount of time we devote to the job as a unit. I found that I was at odds with the information about the seperate generations, though. I like to think on a more individualist level and shy away from labeling big groups. In this class, however, I find that generalizing a selected group can be helpful on a bigger scale that uses major events, such as the Great Depression, versus relying on just a number, like age, to be the determinant factor. A shared experience coupled with a generalized reaction, such as creating a more dedicated work ethic, makes a lot of sense.

Tyler Cline

says:

What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values? How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?

When you look at anything with personalities you must realize that not many people have the same personality and you can’t treat everyone the same. I will take in the Five Big traits that you can use to help you as a supervisor. Another main factor would be to be open at work and agreeable to my workers because stated in the book that people with those traits are more likely and better leaders. Being open would have to be number one for me because you should let employees come talk to you about anything. Self-Monitoring would be another factor that would help me as a leader in the work place because It would help me realize what I’m doing wrong and how to evaluate a situation. Overall, this chapter was very helpful for me to learn more.

bherbert2

says:

Tyler, I definitely agree that every person is different. By using some of the personality tests managers can get a understand of how the employee might react with others or interact. With big companies with different teams, it could be a nice tool to have as a manager using the MBTI and the Big Five personality model can learn how each member will react in a real-life situation and also understand what type their personality is can help mold the perfect team together in the specific setting. Also talking with the employees will go a long way in trying to develop a working relationship with that employee and by doing so as a manager you can understand their personality more and help them in ways to grow within the company.

kaariola

says:

i think you got it right, not everyone has the same personality. However, I do think that certain traits come out depending on the situation. When used in a workplace setting, I think using a personality test can be handy in finding the strengths of a coworker.

Kirsten Veech

says:

What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values? How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?

The biggest take away from this chapter is how important it is to match a persons personality and values with the company they are working for. I have seen where this has not been done and it caused tension and issues in the workplace, which is never desirable. I think that it is a great idea to have people take a test to create a personality profile to help determine which job would best fit each person. It is important to match peoples values with the organization’s values so that everyone is working towards the same goal and therefore on the same team. A personality test would also help with making sure that a person is in the right position for there personality type. For example if one person tends to be very organized and good with systems while another person struggles with organization but has great people skills, it would make sense to have the organizated person creating everyones work schedules while the people person can be at the front desk greeting customers. By using employees strengths and qualities that come easy to them, you are able to make a smoother running office.

When I become a supervisor I will definitely provide personality tests when determining if a candidate is good for a position. I will also make sure to use my employees strengths and make sure I have a balanced team of people with diverse personality types and strengths.

bbell19

bbell19

says:

My biggest complaint about using personality tests when hiring is that obtaining a pure result may be difficult. When seeking a highly desired position, a candidate will want to advertisee themseves as best as possible, this may include skewing the answers to a personality test. An individual may only respod according to how they percieve their future employer wishes them to answer to better enhance their chances. It is rather to divulge personal information about oneself to a company when you are also being scrutinized in an unfamiliar setting. This being the case, I find that there may be more value in seeking out personality classifications after settling in to an entry level position when considering moving to a management position or a job that will demand more from an employee in the same company.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Not enough can be said about values. I supervised an employee who was part of my service counter staff, except he hated customer service. After seeing his responses and reaction to customers (several times) who we were providing products and service to, I asked him why is he here? Why are you part of this company if you hate the work? He couldn’t answer and I parted ways with him.

rjburns2

rjburns2

says:

What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values? How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?

I found this chapter pretty interesting, I can see how acknowledging a persons personality traits can be advantageous. My biggest take away probably was just a reinforcement on what I kind of already knew, everyone is different and it pays off big to understand those differences. I have had a lot of experience over the years delegating and I have noticed that (as the research suggests) when workers feel like they are a part of something (all on the same team) they tend to be more open and understanding as well as willing to put forth more effort. I believe fostering this sense of team can be difficult when dealing with a range of diversity but by acknowledging the common traits that we all have and explaining their role in the workplace we can better encourage communication, satisfaction and overall efficiency. I found the personality tests to be extremely interesting, as it quantifies something that can be very difficult to quantify. I took a few of them online and eventually stumbled onto something called “True Colors”, which I found to be more accurate and a better approach if any of you are interested in understanding personality differences.

ajvinzant2

says:

The point in regards to how different personalities collaborate as a team is a good one. I found myself focusing more on how a personality lines up with a job, and completely missed the team aspect. It would be interesting to see data on how accurate personality tests are at determining the degree to which two people can work together.

I also looked up the test you mentioned, since it wasn’t one I’d heard of and despite not putting much faith in them, I have always liked to take personality tests (almost like taking those silly social media quizzes about, “which angry cat you are,” hah. It was cool to be told my color for once. Nice find.

rjburns2

rjburns2

says:

hello,
Thank you for your response. I believe that all personality traits can work together to a highly successful degree as long as we foster a sense of team work. In a dysfunctional environment diversity can cause confusion and frustration but by addressing these differences and aligning them towards a common goal, diversity becomes a strength. I am glad you found the personality tests cool as well, I think they are particularly useful in understanding what values to stress with which individuals.

alhansen6

says:

My biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values was learning how some companies actually use personality frameworks to help hire employees. The two most used frameworks mentioned in Chapter 5 were the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and The Big Five Personality Model. I will let these be the biggest thing I took away from this chapter because I have not heard of these two different frameworks and how they can be used as a tool to help supervisors. Although, I have heard of tests to help choose a career path and personality tests in general, but I never thought about using them to help hire future employees.

For supervisors and managers, it is very important to know his or hers employees personality traits and values. Knowing different qualities of a person can let you know what motivates that individual, gives clues to figuring out how they will act under stress, how well they can work with others, and where they will best be placed in the company. These are only a few things that I can think of off the top of my head.

Going back to the Myer-Briggs Type Indicator and The Big Five Personality Model, we can tell that these frameworks can help a supervisor hire an employee. From the book describing these two frameworks, “Both describe a person’s total personality through exploration of the facets of personality”. The difference between the two is that the Myer-Briggs Type Indicator puts an individual into one of sixteen personality types out of four characteristics and the Big Five Personality Model touches base with five different personality dimensions.

Overall, from this chapter, I learned that knowing people’s personality traits and values are a huge positive part for a supervisor to know. As stated above, there are so many benefits to it and will make an organization more manageable if an employees traits and values were known. I already had an idea that supervisors should be aware and know these kinds of things, but I never thought about going through an interview for a job and taking a personality test to go along with it. Thinking as a supervisor in the future I would want to get to know my employees the best I can. Having a positive relationship and knowing their personality and values can lead to better management along with better relationships.

rjburns2

rjburns2

says:

Hello,
Very well said and summarized! I agree with you on the importance of personality and values in the work place, though I wasn’t able to articulate as well as you. I had also never considered using a personality test to screen prospective employees but it makes perfect sense and seem to be a very useful tool. Did you have a preference between the MBTI and The Big Five? if so, why? Good work on your post and I look forward to reading more in the future.

negentzwilkins

says:

M5 (Week 5) Assignment
What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values? How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?

Understanding personality is very important when it comes to determining the best strategy of keeping a team focused, motivated and effective. This chapter was an interesting read for me and it validated much of what I already know – from hand on experience and lessons learned. The biggest take away for me was how to link and individual’s personality and values to an appropriate job.

I thought it was interesting how values can often help to shed some light on an individual’s attitude, behavior, and perception. I appreciated John Holland’s personality-job fit theory. I thought the visual (Exhibit 5) was very interesting. I manage a team of 15 workers and I feel his theory can be very helpful for leaders and individual contributors to find an appropriate job fit.

The individuals on my team are very diverse, varying ages, and varying strengths and weaknesses – and each very qualified to do their jobs. We have taken an abbreviated personality test in the past and I often take their results into consideration when assigning certain tasks, when our team is up against a challenge, when I put together a team, when company changes come our way, etc.

Recently, when I was asked to run a series of complex reports, I turned to the tech wizard on our team. He is also very shy and keeps to himself, he was flattered that I asked and was happy to oblige. This same task may have sent the individual who would prefer the pencil and paper days over the edge. Based on past personality tests and being familiar with their strengths and weaknesses I was able to do this. Had I intended to “test” an individual or set them up for failure – I may have done the opposite.

alhansen6

says:

Negentzwilkins, I agree with you about how John Holland’s personal job fit theory can help people find a job that fits them. I didn’t mention that in my response but I brought up the Myer Briggs and Big Five Model as I was interested how I never knew they were used to help managers and supervisors figure out employers traits and values. You seem to have a group of people that are diverse and have figured out how to manage everything well. Of course, knowing employees personality traits will help shed light on that individual’s actions, behavior, and how they perceive things. I believe that if a manager puts in the effort to get to know his or her employees, they will help out themselves and everybody involved the group.

Alden

Alden

says:

Hello,
I think you have a great point in terms of the personality fits the job aspect. By figuring out exactly what the employees are comfortable with and how they will respond to a situation, progress can be made at a faster pace just by assigning the right tasks to the right person. Great example with the reports.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

This is a great way to understand what will motivate or (on the opposite end) what will aggravate an employee – knowing them and what they value and will be good at.

hjmoyle

hjmoyle

says:

There is a great deal of information I can take away from this chapter. The most important piece of information I have gather from this chapter is personality can explain behavior. A good manager can manipulate personality to bring out the best traits and minimize the worse. Using personality tests like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Big Five Model can help predict the personality types of future employees, so that you can understand them. Personality tests can also be used to predict how candidates will fit in the organization’s environment. I believe taking personality tests can help when you are debating about what to do in life or what major to pick in college because it can predict person-job fit. I have known people that have gotten degrees and have found out that they are unhappy and unsuccessful after landing a job and personality tests could have saved them some money and time. Taking a personality test before deciding on an occupational can give people an idea of their strengths and weaknesses, so that they can be aware of them. I have used personality tests to help predict future occupations and I have found it very useful.

arbankston

arbankston

says:

Thanks for your input! I value your ideas on how personality tests can be utilized for personal use and also for professional use. It’s important that we try to use as many resources as we can to help us get in the right direction that will lead to a job that best fits each of us and then the managers can also take advantage of being able to better know their employees and their role in the organization.

arbankston

arbankston

says:

Most importantly, personalities are important for both employees and their managers. And personality tests are not only beneficial for managers to get to know but for individuals to get to know themselves better in a way that helps them to understand the way they work. This was an incredibly important chapter that I will definitely keep with me as I continue to hold employment positions, and some of it I have also learned through my own experience. While personality tests can be beneficial and useful to managers for hiring and getting to know their current employees, I think it’s most important to actually get to know the employees at some level so that you actually get to know them. I had a wonderful experience with my first manager. It can help facilitate a dynamic between employees that work well together and know how to better handle experiences where differences between employees arise. One of the greatest things that can come from knowing your employees is being able to assist them with their attitude towards work and where there are opportunities for them to grow. A manager and/or supervisor who is out of touch with their employees will not quite as good as a time as one who knows their employees.

bherbert2

says:

I couldn’t agree with you more about getting to understand employees as a manager. Getting to understand someone’s personality can go a long way when working with them. Understanding what their work effort is and understanding their attitude towards their work can help managers provide specific goals for that employee. On top of those goals, the manager will also understand what they need to do to help the employee grow and improve. With manager caring about getting to understand an employee can go a long way in workplace performance. As the book stated I believe the personality tests given to employees can be a great starting point on getting to know your fellow workers.

mswalker

mswalker

says:

I agree with you. Getting to know your employees goes a long way. Learning about their personalities give you as a supervisor a better understanding of them and ways that you can help to make them a happier employee and hopefully, they will stay around longer. While I would never give my employees a personality test, I will make every effort to get to know them.

rcskieens

says:

I would have to agree with you on how getting to know an employee in the work environment can change work performance and attitudes. I’ve held a couple jobs where the management bought in on me as an employee, treated me like a friend and showed interest in my person life. It may just be the little things, but on the other hand I’ve worked other jobs where it was strictly just work and no room for anything like that. My attitude when I woke up each morning for work was much better for the management bought in.

jlshepard

says:

I enjoyed reading about Hofstedes work on cultural differences in value systems. I’ve came across his work for other classes and have always thought it fascinating how one race of people can be so different. Especially when it comes to the important things, for example, here in the U.S. we are very individualistic, believing in our own rights above almost anything else. Then there are countries in South America, such as Guatemala, who are on the complete other end of the spectrum, who value collectivism, and expect others to look out for them.
In every business class I’ve taken, we’ve had it drilled into our heads how people’s cultures affect their lives. What they eat, what they buy, and what they do. The biggest take away from this chapter that I will use in my career is the fact that people are different, and value things differently. Get to know your subordinates, what motivates them, what they respect, and learn to respect them. Most people are open to communication, you just have to know how to speak to them.

Alan

Alan

says:

It’s always fascinating to see where different cultures place value. I like that you brought this up, especially the polarized views on, for lack of a better term, self-worth of an individual. I have always wondered what it would be like to work in a different culture with different values than my own. It would definitely build awareness for the possibility of entering a global company. Good post.

brlund2

says:

That is great insight and clearly a great message to take with you. I can’t disagree.. Every business class I’ve attended as well has taken the concepts of diversity and cultural norms very seriously in one way or anther. In what ways do you think you would show this understanding? Is it going far enough to simply ensure that the diversity of your workforce matches the diversity of the community? Or does it require active measures as a part of the managerial job description, or something else? Just broadening the topic a bit.

Josh Petersen

says:

What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values? How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?

My biggest takeaway in this chapter is how important someone’s personality is with their job performance and sustainability. Being a supervisor you want to make an effort to make sure that your employees are at least somewhat happy. To do this you need to try to put them in a role that matches their personality and personal values. By doing this you have a much better chance to get an overall higher performance out of them. If they are happy in the job they are in you also get a much higher chance of them staying with the company. This is very important due to the fact that experience is a huge factor in how efficient and knowledgeable a employee is. Employees that are knowledgeable and are efficient at their job make things run a lot smoother. In the job that I am currently in, the majority of employees have only been there for a year or less. This has put a big strain on the whole workplace due to the fact that the majority of us are currently in training or just got out of training. This has shown me how important it is to keep people around and how valuable employees with experience are.

cdday2

cdday2

says:

You have a fantastic point about sustainability. I’ve also been in situations where I have been a new employee and someone is hired after me and they have no clue and ASSUME that I’ve been at the job for a long time! Or they were hired one way and I was told something different. This confusion leads to difficulty for everyone. Often times there are assumptions about people as well, such as age means experience!

hjmoyle

hjmoyle

says:

I never thought much about personality and job performance until I read this chapter. For instance, when I have applied for jobs I have always tried to make myself appealing to their company without wondering if I would be happy there or if their goals were similar to mine. I thought that all jobs sucked and that all businesses were the same, but I was wrong. The jobs were I was happiest, I was also the most productive because I liked being there and I liked the company I worked.

rcskieens

says:

Josh,
You made another good point that got me thinking again. You mentioned how it is important that an employee has a positive personality and is happy in the work place. I got into thinking how the personality aspect of this chapter was about how an individual’s personalty relates to working well in a specific position such as getting along with others and communicating to customers. An individual’s personality can change depending if they are having a positive or negative experience. Perhaps an employee that looks like they have a poor personality could just be them not being happy with their position. Thanks for the insight.

mswalker

mswalker

says:

As a supervisor, I find that tailoring expectations and goals depends a lot on the employees personality. For example, I have one employee who some people find to be “rude”. In all actually, she’s not rude, she’s just very straight forward. I have another that is somewhat new and was afraid to approach me because she was intimidated by me. This is her first real job.

Working with the military also exposes all of us to different backgrounds and cultures. These are things that as a supervisor, one needs to be sensitive to as well as respectful of those diversities. What I have also found is being respectful of the differences has helped me to retain employees of the same job better than other departments in my organization. I have happier employees.

brlund2

says:

One of my biggest takeaways from this lesson may not have been intended, so I will focus on that in an effort to diversify the discussion.
There are many ways to attempt to profile a potential employee, who may also be referred to as a human being, but no line of questioning can paint a full picture of a person or what they are capable of. The reason that there are so many different methods of measuring personalities and values is that none of them have the perfect formula for reading every aspect of a person.
As a former and future supervisor, I think it is important to use these tests in a productive manner, as only a part of a dynamic approach to management of personnel. For example, in a team setting, The Myers-Briggs Test’s results could be shared among coworkers in a group setting. It could facilitate team-building discussions about how their interpersonal relationships are affected by certain personality traits revealed in the test. In this way, the test isn’t used as a be-all-end-all, but rather a way to filter those results into points of conversation that actually matter to the members of the team. By utilizing the personality tests in this manner, a manager could compound the results achieved from simply administering the assessments.

rcskieens

says:

What is your biggest take away from this chapter on Personality and Values? How will you use it as a supervisor in the future?
My biggest take away from this chapter on personality and values pertains to how these traits can equate to an individual excelling in the workplace if they are managed properly. In my personal experience I have found that there are different levels of work ethic that individuals have consider to be a standard. Those with a very strong work ethic value that trait about themselves and want to do their best work. Not saying that others with a lesser work ethic don’t have values but perhaps their values are not as concentrated in the same areas as the before mentioned. I have noticed in myself that I do good in situations where I am tasked to buckle down and get a project done. I have also noticed that in some customer service aspects of the job I am flawed compared to some others. Some people have developed the personality to be social and excel at these certain aspects of a job. Overall, what I am getting at is if a manager is able to determine an individual’s strengths such as a Type-A personality or a strong work ethic, they can set these employees up for success by putting them in positions that they will excel in.

Erin Kitchin

says:

My biggest take away from this chapter is how much organizational values tie into personalities. Starting with personalities, there are a wide range, as the chapter suggest. There are also numerous ways for personalities to be measured, i.e. Myers Briggs and the big 5. These personalities are some of which employers look for in a promising employee. Employers can gauge what type of person their employee will be. Hopefully their personality fits in with the values of the organization. If the organization has set values, they can be reached and upheld easier when the workforce also recognizes the same values. Typically an honest person will uphold values that reflect integrity.
Another tid bit from this chapter that I found interesting was the “Dark Triad”. I had not heard Machiavellianism, used as a type of personality before. The Psychopathy section was interesting to read, because they did not approach it from a mental illness perspective. They described it as no concern for others and a lack of empathy. However, there was no significant findings in this trait and poor job performance. Maybe there’s more to look into.

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