M3 – Job Satisfaction

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M3 (Week 3) Assignment

Choose one question from below to answer.  

  1. Describe a job you have held in which you were very satisfied and had a good attitude about your work. What factors caused you to be so satisfied and happy? How will you use (or how have you used) this experience as a supervisor?
  2. Describe a job you have held in which you were very dissatisfied and had a poor attitude about your work. What factors caused you to be dissatisfied and what could management have done to increase your job satisfaction?

76 Comments for “M3 – Job Satisfaction”

clsmith24

says:

1. I currently am employed at a local coffee stand, Mocha Dan’s, and have been for about 6 years now. I currently am very satisfied with my job and always come to work with a good attitude. I also work with ladies that have been working for the business for 20+ years! Some factors that lead to the satisfaction in our job is we feel cared for by the business owners and heard when we have concerns. Another reason we are satisfied at our job is the owner is invested in each of our lives, and overall well-being. Every year we have a Christmas party at the owner’s house which shows us that they are willing to invite us into their lives, rather then just pay us every two weeks.
2. All this being said, I have never worked at another job so I have never had an experience where I was dissatisfied with a job. In reality, I have had moments where I have been dissatisfied with my work atmosphere from time to time, because no workplace is perfect. The reason I have been dissatisfied in the past stems from us being short-staffed for various reasons. When we are short-staffed, it naturally puts more stress on the people that are working. Our management does their best to keep this from happening, but when it does, they are very quick to help ease the stress whether it means they come in work, or they compensate for an extra day off.

Tyler Cline

says:

Smith,
I would totally agree with you that jobs can have days that are easy and days are tough. Really takes a lot of people. Im glad that you have had a great experience at mocha dan’s to not leave and not take another job. Great post

bherbert2

says:

I’m glade that you so far had a good experience working for that company. As managers caring about their workforce will help reduce turnover and also increase job satisfaction. Hearing the concerns from the employees is also an important factor. Getting concerns from employees and acknowledging the weakness and trying their best to improve shows that you do matter as an employee for their company. Every company will have their weaknesses from tight budgets to low staffing levels but as long as they show empathy to the employees it makes working for a company like that worthwhile and boosts job satisfaction.

mswalker

mswalker

says:

I think having a good supervisor and a good atmosphere to work in definitely contributes the most to an employee being satisfied in their job. I am often asked how I can keep staff in my current job compared to others who cannot keep the same type of staff. I tell them that it’s simple. Keep your staff happy. Support them, praise them when they are doing a good job and always say “thank you”. Those few things make an employee feel appreciated.

kaariola

says:

I appreciate your approach when it comes to bad days. I too look at “unsatisfying experiences” as more of a learning experience for the future. Huge props to you for maintaining longevity with your job, customer service isn’t the easiest for most people so more power to you! Great post!

Jami

says:

I totally agree with you on the shortness of staff. Sometimes there is no control of what can happen. But it sounds like you do have boss’s that try and not put you in that kind of situation. I can tell you exactly how it feels to play for a boss that does only care about the business and not his employees.

hjmoyle

hjmoyle

says:

I’m happy you’re satisfied at your job. I wish my job sponsored a Christmas party every year or any event that helped the employees feel more united. I like my job, but everyone could get along better.

rcskieens

says:

Smith,
I’m glad that you have had such a good experience with your current employment. It’s a lot easier waking up in the morning for a job that you enjoy. I can also understand what you mean about stressing for work in regards to low staffing. There have been several times in my career that I found myself in similar situations. When you employer reaches out and does everything they can to help in those situations it diffidently gets easier.

alhansen6

says:

I mainly work only in the summers as I am always busy with school and sports in the winter. I have had many jobs that I liked and many jobs that I have disliked. The one job that I keep thinking about is my barista job, which has been my all time favorite job ever. The coffee shop is called “Shearwater Art & Espresso”, and my boss who owns it, is this incredibly nice person who seems to get a long with everyone. By the name of this place, we sell coffee, art, clothing, and tickets for wifi.

There are so many factors that caused me to be so happy to go to work at seven in the morning and serve coffee to people. So first off, this coffee shop is located in the middle of a boatyard and has a tremendous view of the river and banks. If you can picture the most beautiful sunrise while listening to some “feel good” music, sipping on some iced coffee, I do not see how you can start your day off bad. Not to mention I get to meet people from all over the world who come and fish in my hometown, because where I am from is one of the biggest fishing industries in the world. I do have to include that my co workers were incredibly nice and I got to know all of them very well. Having a stress free environment with soft music that fills your ears, is really an awesome place to study, relax and hang out.

Having experienced a job that I was extremely happy with in the summer has really impacted me. I have supervised after working at this job, and it definitely has taught me to be more talkative and outgoing. Working in an environment where you are constantly interacting with people and having down time with your co workers, you are almost always talking. It would sometimes be so busy that we would have to call in our boss for help, so I used that experience for keeping calm while working under stress.

Overall working as a barista has been a really amazing experience for me, and not to mention the tips were great!

bbell19

bbell19

says:

I believe the working environment is very important and from what you described, Shearwater Espresso & Art sounds brilliant in pairing scenic views with a relaxed, artistic space. I am immediately brought back to summer roadtrips across Alaska! The attitude of the employess is also an important dynamic of your environment that helps to create the easy going atmosphere of a laid back cafe, crucial to the environment in that business. I have worked previously as a barista in a very fast paced bistro where we were lacking in the easy-going charm and I feel that radiated out to our customers who in turn responded in being very closed off. You reap what you sow, in that instance the bistro was efficient but lacking in warmth and ultimatley that was how our clientele responded.

Jami

says:

I think the setting and who you work with count a lot. People react and act to their own surroundings. Your comfort level and how you feel will make your work stand out even more.

sstetzinger

sstetzinger

says:

It sounds like you had a great job! What struck me as interesting reading your post is that so much of your happiness in your position came from the environment in which you worked. Your positive attitude seems to be derived from what you saw (the scenery), what you heard (the music), and who you interacted with (your coworkers and patrons). Your positive attitude did not seem to hinge on the specific work you were doing (making coffee or selling goods). As both employees and potential future leaders, this is important for us to note. First, as employees, we can recognize that when looking for jobs, the subject matter of the job is not as important to seek out as finding an environment that will bring us happiness. Second, as leaders we can understand that creating a positive environment can lead our employees to find satisfaction in their work regardless of what the day’s tasks include. Thanks for sharing, and thanks for what you do. I appreciate coffee shops being open on my way to work in the morning!

brlund2

says:

I swear everybody that works in coffee shops loves their jobs. It must have to do with the fact that you guys make a real difference in the world! I mean that in jest, but honestly, some of us can’t live without our coffee. It is always key to have fun and energetic coworkers around to make a job more enjoyable. After all, attitudes can change quite a bit about a business.

bbell19

bbell19

says:

2. I have had a multitude of vocations that range from parking lot attendant to document integrity analyst in the US Air Force, and from my collective 12 years as a self supporting adult I would say my worst experience was working in a movie theater. I was hired on to assist the projectionist, a role I was very excited about. Instead of taking up that position, however, I was instead scheduled to work the concessions and assured that this was a temporary switch. I did not remain with this company very long as the management had a tendency of making false promises to its employees. Another clear cut sign that the working dynamic between upper management and employees was not amiable was the high turnover rate.

Although this job was very frustrating, I have decided to look back on it as an educational experience. It was in this position that I learned to respect myself and that I would need to be the one to challenge decisions by manaement that were unfair becuse no one else will. Each individual in a company has their own interests, needs and desires that are seperate from the overall company’s needs. Without making those individual level concerns known it will ultimately build up and fester into animosity and discontent towards the employer. Had I had a chance to redo my job at the movie theater I feel like communication would be a bigger priority and I have since tried to make sure that each position I hold henceforth I am being open with upper management.

arbankston

arbankston

says:

It’s good that you’re able to take your bad work experience as an educational experience. It’s terrible that they would make false promises since honesty and trust is incredibly important to have between management and the employees. In any situation, communication does help the two so it’s good that you’ve learned to utilize it in favor of your position and your relationship with management. Thanks for sharing your experience!

cdday2

cdday2

says:

That is fantastic that you were able to leave and stand up for yourself quickly! My biggest fault is staying too long, and as you said, things fester and build up. In my experience, this ends in me walking out with no notice. One of the things I try to find out about a place is the turn-over rate now! In bigger places it might be harder to do, but here it’s easy! My favorite job was working for a couple who owned their own pharmacy and were the pharmacists. Part of their interviewing was questions on personality and attitudes and how well I would fit in with the ladies that worked there already. They paid well and there were little perks, like coffee from the little coffee shop next door and fun dressing up for Halloween!

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

False promises from anyone, especially supervisors or owners really leads to distrust and low expectations from them. Sorry you experienced this.

Jami

says:

Describe a job you have held in which you were very satisfied and had a good attitude about your work. What factors caused you to be so satisfied and happy? How will you use (or how have you used) this experience as a supervisor?

I am employed by Bristol Bay Campus – UAF located originally in Dillingham. I have worked with this campus as a financial aid coordinator and academic advisor for the last 3 and a half years. I enjoy working with all ages of students and helping them feel good about going to school and finding funding. Explaining financial aid and the classes that will help them pursue what they will enjoy doing the rest of their lives even though it may change throughout their life. It’s the smile on their face and seeing them come back appreciating what they learn and gain. I have supervised people before and it is self satisfaction to want to wake up everyday wanting to go to work and enjoy helping people. Any little bit helps and it can make a difference.

dafausnaugh

dafausnaugh

says:

I believe this is a really satisfying job that I would enjoy. I love helping others and helping them build their future would be the best way to live in my opinion. Ironically though, I am hoping to be able to help others continue to live the best lives possible after getting out the military. I think you are showing great loyalty being with the university as long as you have been. Thank you for the post.

ilukulay

says:

Thats really good that you really liked your job. You help make student life a lot easier. The transition is always hard but as a coordinator you make it much easy.

alhansen6

says:

I was drawn to your post because you mentioned Dillingham, I am very familiar with that place and have a lot of family there. From your description of your job, I can really tell that you truly care about peoples success. For my senior year of high school, I spent a lot of time with my academic adviser before graduation, as I needed help with scholarships, and I know that she truly cared for me as a person and wanted me to do the best I can. Having this type of guidance, while having a close relationship with your adviser, gave me more motivation. I was very thankful!

ajvinzant2

says:

Currently, I work for myself, but prior to that I had quite a few traditional jobs. I can honestly say that while some of them were poorly managed, I was never dissatisfied at any of them. I’ve always found that situations are what we make them. On that note, I think that employee perspectives certainly can make just as much difference in the productivity of a team as its managers.

For example, as a teen I worked at taco bell—well, beyond my teens, I was there for about 6 years. I eventually became a manager there, but for most of my time with them it was a fair representation of your stereotypical fast-food joint. There was a very high turnover. Most the employees were young and had little experience and work ethic. It was constantly under-staffed, and upper management was completely burned out. Most of the people there hated their jobs, and it showed.

There were a few people on that crew who didn’t view it that way though. It was a crap job, yes, but they would come in every day with a smile and do their best to just make a good time of it. There was this notable shift in attitude when they clocked on, regardless of the state of management. This isn’t to say that it’s not easier for employees to be happy at work with things like proper scheduling, time management, and logistics—just that for me, who I was working with and their attitude was always a bigger factor. Staffing matters.

If I were ever to leave my solo gig here as boss of me, myself, and only I, I would probably use that experience both when hiring and while on the job—to try and be that person who shifts the mood.

negentzwilkins

says:

You noted that employee perspective can make just as much difference in the productivity of a team as its manger. I completely agree with your thought, and I find that having that perspective is very important especially when it comes to running your own business. Having worked in both very negative and positive work environments, owning my own business, and in a supervisory role I believe that a person will be as productive as they want or are willing to be.

It can be disappointing to see a negative mood shift when an employee clocks in, and it is great that you would be the one to try and shift that mood. There is value in having employees that always see the positive. However, constantly being the one to shift the mood can be very exhausting.

In cases like this, it is always great to see management recognize and identify their problem areas and make efforts to mitigate or lessen the behaviors that cause great dissatisfaction among employees.

brlund2

says:

That’s a great perspective to have and I completely agree. The right mindset can turn almost anything into a positive experience and the momentum of that attitude across a team/company is palpable. Congratulations on your self-employment!

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Its a testament to you for sticking with Taco Bell for 6 years. It shows you wanted to make a difference and get experience.

sstetzinger

sstetzinger

says:

1. I currently work as a firefighter for the Los Angeles Fire Department, and this job brings me the most satisfaction that I have had in my working career. The good people who I work with and the opportunities that are available, such as for advancement or to develop other areas of expertise, make it easy to come to work every shift with a good attitude. When looking to a specific example of when I was especially satisfied with the LAFD, I focus on when I was stationed in South Central Los Angeles, a particularly rough neighborhood, at one of the busiest stations in the city. The assignment was challenging and tested my abilities as a firefighter as the station averaged responding to more than 50 calls a day and we saw a great deal of trauma (shootings, etc.). Despite these challenges, knowing that I was working with some of the best firefighters in the world towards a common goal made it easy for me to maintain a positive attitude. Other factors that bolstered morale within the station were good leadership from the captain and senior firefighters, effective training, and comradery amongst the crew.

I learned a lot while working at that station, and I will definitely draw on that experience as a future leader. Specifically, I will keep in mind that the scenarios the crew faces are not what leads to good attitudes, but rather it is how the leaders approach the scenarios that is impactful. I will strive to emulate my leaders’ ability to create a positive atmosphere when I am in a leadership position. Also, through observing leaders at this station, I learned that when conducting training, it is beneficial to create an environment that is accepting of mistakes and provides positive feedback. Our mantra is “Train as if your life depends on it because it does.” By being accepting of mistakes in training, we can build confidence in our skills so that we are less likely to make mistakes in the field. I will carry the importance of creating a learning atmosphere and giving supportive feedback with me in all future experiences, whether I am in a direct leadership position or am simply doing one on one training with newer firefighters.

ajvinzant2

says:

Thank you for your service. Do you think that the field you worked in particular, being one that helped people, added to your feeling of satisfaction with the job? I know that one reason I’ve quit jobs in the past was that they didn’t feel like they contributed anything to humanity. I always thought something like nursing or police work would be more fulfilling in that aspect, yet in the text many of the jobs listed with a low satisfaction are the types of jobs that help people. I suppose maybe the high stress probably factors in there.

rcskieens

says:

Howdy,
It sounds like you have an impressive career surrounded by a lot of great people. I can imagine that dealing with that work load could be difficult at times, but it’s a good thing you had a supportive team and a good employer. 50 calls a day sounds exhausting, but the experience you got from all the long shifts must have molded you into an even better firefighter.

negentzwilkins

says:

M3 – Job Satisfaction

1. While attending college in Portland, OR I was hired on at a branding company. It was a small family run company, and they were just finding their niche and really starting to grow. I wasn’t there long before I became part owner of the company. There were several factors that caused me to be very satisfied with my job. One thing I remember most is that there was rarely any negativity; the environment was very positive, supportive, and encouraging. There were opportunities for growth. I was trained to complete certain tasks, and then let alone to explore my own way of doing things. Accountability was extended. I was allowed to fail, I was expected to own my mistakes, and I was allowed to learn from them. I was valued. I was often asked for feedback (What was working well? What wasn’t?). It was a “safe” environment. If I had an issue or concern, I was expected to also have a solution or resolution to go with it. It wasn’t just a business, we were a team, and we were family.

I learned and grew so much from the mentorship from the folks that made up the company. I use my experiences from my time there every day, not just as a supervisor but life in general. As a supervisor of a team that is spread from Deadhorse, AK to Valdez, AK I make sure that I check in with my reports at least once a week. Despite distance between my team members, I strive to create a positive and supportive environment. I reach out, I listen, and we brainstorm problems and solutions – not only for work but sometimes on a personal level as well. If there are any struggles or negativity present, we identify it and come up with a way to overcome the struggle or turn the negativity around. I extend accountability. Each individual on my team was trained to do their job and given the tools to succeed. I monitor their work load, I seek feedback from their clients but I don’t manage their workload – I am not in their business. I trust that they are where they need to be, and doing what they should be doing. Mistakes happen and when they do, they bring them up immediately and we walk through the process together, whether it is a simple fix, a more lengthy report or investigation that follows. Each person on my team is valued. New ideas are always welcome, and when feasible we implement them. Also, I never ask them to do something that I would not do myself. I always say that we have the best team in the company! We really do.

bherbert2

says:

It is great to hear that you had a positive environment to work in a family runned company. As a manager creating that type of environment is crucial to to provide to the employees that work for the company. Studies have shown that managers that provide a positive work environment, and also listens to the employees concerns and tries their best to fix them will have an increase in productivity. Being able to be honest about mistakes you’ve made is an important step to make, we are all humans and will make a mistake sooner or later. Companies need to understand that mistakes happen and help the employee after the mistake was made by training, and teaching them how to improve. It sounds like you are doing a great job of improving overall job satisfaction, and it’s great to hear you really enjoy your job!!

mjwilliams10

says:

2. I was a police radio dispatcher for the Honolulu Police Department. I still have very mixed feelings about that job. Most of my dissatisfaction stemmed from the work itself. I worked the 9pm to 6am shift. My overall health took a hit from the odd work schedule. The shifts were based on seniority, and it typically take s 10 years to get out of graveyard. After learning that, I was slightly unmotivated. The callers increased my dissatisfaction. People call 911 for the silliest things like a broken hair dryer or they saw an African American who was not doing anything wrong. Some people called because they were lonely and others had mental illnesses. They usually called from the psychiatric ward of Queens Hospital saying they were the emperor of China or needed a chip removed from their brain. Sometimes, I would have to explain the law and handle angry officer complaints. I felt like people abused the 911 system, which frustrated me. The Communications Division is greatly understaffed and we had to put people on hold for 911 emergency calls. People calling fireworks in as an emergency kept me from helping people with real emergencies and is beyond annoying.

I became a dispatcher to help people in crisis, and there were times when I did. One caller had just been choked by a male. I stayed on the phone with her asking her questions about the suspect until the police arrived. They arrested the man based on the information she gave me. That was a satisfying work moment.

I do not think there was much management could have done to increase my job satisfaction. The turnover rate for this job is high. I think only about 10% stay through the first year. Ignoring the stress and urgency of the calls, the job was still very difficult. We used four monitors with multiple windows opened and three keyboards. A big problem for me was Hawaiian street names, which are very long and hard to spell. I would often get frustrated just trying to get someone’s location because neither the caller nor I could say or spell the street. Hawaii also has a very diverse population and many people cannot speak English or have very strong accents. It made my job more difficult when I could not understand the caller. My supervisors many times told me that our job was harder than dispatchers on the mainland and that is why the county recently increased our pay. I feel like the pay was not enough compensation, but 21 sick days and 21 paid time off was great. I got along well with my supervisors and appreciated how supportive they were of us. I could tell they were trying hard for us to do well and actually stay almost to the point of desperation. The police chief met with us and gave a speech about how we are not appreciated enough and that the officers would not be able to do their job without us and many times officers thanked us. I think I did not have the patience required for the job. The stress, late hours, and the abuse of the 911 system got to me. We even used the term “chronics” for chronic callers who called every day and some people called up to 20 times a night.

negentzwilkins

says:

Wow! Holy stressful job!
In your case it wasn’t necessarily management, it was the task itself. I think some persons may be cut out for both the schedule, stress of real life emergencies, working through mental illness related issues, and annoying calls. Some days could be super satisfying yet others so dismal.

That being said I wonder if there are things that management could help with. Sometimes a person cannot be appreciated enough, but are there mechanisms out there that could alleviate some of the stress so that you can better feel the satisfaction from your job? Just a thought.

I’ve not done the research but it seems like a career with a high turn around and/or burn out rate.

bherbert2

says:

2. The job that I am currently doing is a Paramedic. In the first place, it is a very hard job to do and the schooling to become a Paramedic is very intense. I have never struggled and studied so hard ever in my life to complete everything and pass all the tests to become a Paramedic. I have had my ups and downs when it comes to this job. Sometimes I am able to help people who really need it, and actually, call 911 for a real emergency. The other times which is almost over 70% I feel like I am just a taxi driver because there is nothing I can do for them. The individual is not even having an emergency where they need any lifesaving treatments or medication administration, all they really need is a car to take them to the hospital. There are so many things wrong with the 911 system and so many people decide to abuse the system. With the workforce working long hours and many working overtime hours it gets tiring really fast and can affect you in so many ways mentally and physically.
Working for a big private ambulance company also doesn’t help. In the county I work in all that should be happening goes at a very slow pace. The upper management, unfortunately, has no idea how to do their jobs correctly and it becomes very frustrating. A great example is when I upgraded from an EMT to a Paramedic I needed to go through an accreditation in the county I work in. This involves running advanced life support calls and administering medications. During this time I was getting paid only EMT wages even though I was doing everything a Paramedic does. I tried to work it out with my operations manager and for months all I got from him was “I’ll look into it”. With the constant excuses and no real answers, I finally submitted a claim to the labor board for wages the company owed me. I did finally get the correct wages they owed me because they had no other choice. The upper management and HR representatives didn’t help me in the slightest. As a manager, one of the primary duties you have is to keep in contact with employees and respond back to emails in a timely manner which never happened in my case. Treating employees fairly and caring about them is another thing I learned from that experience. When treating employees with kindness, caring about their job, how to improve their experience, and responding back to emails to keep a good line of communication are all traits that I have learned that is needed as a manager. In the end, I do still want to help the community and help the individuals that really need my help. I keep the good calls in my head to remind me of the good work I have done.

ajvinzant2

says:

It was interesting to read your comment and Makayla’s (I hope I didn’t slaughter the spelling there) above yours. I had never considered that people would abuse the 911 service or ambulances (the later given the cost). While I can certainly see how that sort of thing would be frustrating, but at the same time it makes me sad to hear that we have so many people in our society so desperate for interaction and companionship they’d misuse an emergency service to get it.

mjwilliams10

says:

It’s MeKayla, but it’s okay. Nobody ever spells my name correctly, because I have a weird spelling. I agree it is sad. It wasn’t like I didn’t want to help them either. I just had other people who were in life threatening situations that needed my help more.

mjwilliams10

says:

I read your post after writing mine. I’m guessing you are a paramedic in Alaska. It seems that the abuse of the 911 service occurs on a national level. I was hoping it was just a Hawaii thing. I admire you for sticking with it, especially with the poor management. I hope things improve for you, and you really do have to keep the good aspects of the job in mind to get through the difficult days.

bherbert2

says:

I am a Paramedic in California. Your definitely not alone and is not a Hawaii thing when it comes to people abusing the system.

Erin Kitchin

Erin Kitchin

says:

I too work as a first responder and have worked with plenty of people who have gone through paramedic school. Kudos to all of you who make it. Working and going to school full time is never easy, especially paramedic school. It’s also a lot worse when your employer doesn’t help you. I completely understand and relate to those calls you are talking about. We get we’re supposed to be there to protect and help the community, but you’re absolutely right, people do take advantage of us. We are human too and those calls can become so taxing. It’s unfortunate to hear that you were not being compensated for your paramedic license. Again, the job is one to serve people, but like I said earlier, we’re humans too and need to be able to feed ourselves at the end of the day. And like any job, we appreciate incentives and when our work is recognized.

negentzwilkins

says:

First – thank you for doing what you do. I don’t have the wherewith all to even get my blood drawn, let alone look at someone else’s.

I’ve heard from others that are in your line of work that the 911 system is frequently abused, and that there doesn’t seem to be a clear solution. It seems like the abuse is caused by a number of factors and that really it is a nationwide problem and a critical issue that stems from the way our health care is set up at a level that is out of our control as a citizen.

In your case however, in addition to the abuse of the 911 system, upper management is not performing at a level you would expect them to. It is unfortunate that individuals are placed in management positions when they are not good leaders. I always say that anyone can be a boss, but not everyone can be a good leader.

Our textbooks references individuals being proactive, how they are often self-empowered and also more likely to seek solutions. Although it is a struggle to be in the position you are in right now, It sounds like you are the proactive solution-seeker they are referencing.

Keep focused on the good, continue to advocate for yourself, and what is right, I believe that those behaviors will get you far.

dafausnaugh

dafausnaugh

says:

Describe a job you have held in which you were very satisfied and had a good attitude about your work. What factors caused you to be so satisfied and happy? How will you use (or how have you used) this experience as a supervisor?

Before I relocated, I worked for MAC Federal Credit Union in Fairbanks, Alaska. I was a Member Service Representative, also known as a teller for the credit union. This job was extremely satisfying for many reasons, but the biggest being the communication that was shared with other tellers and members. This may seem like some basic stuff, but sometimes a member asking how MY day is going can make the day go a lot easier. Putting a smile on my face and then in return making sure they are smiling as well.

This working environment was about volunteering around the community and making sure the members felt like family. It was never the same thing twice and always seeing members smile made me smile. I enjoyed that we were not told how to talk to members but to make sure that they were having a good day. This sometimes included talking about their bad day a little longer to help them feel better. Being able to check on their days made my day better as I am a caring person, and this resulted in my loving my job.

I only had one bad experience at the job and that was when a dissatisfied member spit on me. I was still satisfied with my job, but he did play a role in making the day harder. My supervisor also played a big role in my satisfaction as he never micromanaged us. He was around when we needed help and then he was not when he knew we could handle the job. I am hoping to be able to take the communication factor and the ability to not micromanage with me into my supervising future. I feel that when you allow someone to learn and understand their job so that they can stand on their two own feet can bring satisfaction.

abconstable

says:

It’s a great point that you bring up about not being to what to say to a member, but rather to make sure they were having a good day. I worked for companies before where we had to say the same lines over and over to customers and it could get repetitive. There was no enthusiasm behind the words after saying them over and over again day after day. Being able to be flexible with customers and give them that personal experience makes them feel valued and appreciated as an individual rather than just viewed as another customer. It’s great that you had such a good experience working for MAC. Loving your job definitely makes it so much easier.

Alan

Alan

says:

I am very curious what happened to the man who spit on a teller inside of a bank. Was he forced to close his account? Did his spit result in him getting his way? What dollar amount was in dispute? $15? What a cliff hanger!

I truly respect service jobs, I could never deal with customers on a daily basis for that exact reason. The environment you describe sounds very pleasant though, so maybe I could do that.

Tyler Cline

says:

A job that I had that I loved during my time was working at a Hockey Pro Shop. Mostly, I liked it so, much because I enjoy playing and watching hockey. Another main reason was helping young kids get into the game of hockey like I did. My manager that I had during my time was great to me and to every employee that worked there. If a crappy job was given out to an employee like clean the bathrooms, the manager would make sure that you didn’t get it again until everyone did it first. A main thing that I will take away from him was being fair to everyone no matter what.

A job that I disliked was working for a moving company 2 summers ago. This experience ruined a summer and mentally drained me. For starters, I was only looking for 30 to 40 hours a week to still have time for my summer classes but, I was starting to get scheduled for 50 to 60 hours. Yes, having all those hours were nice to have but, really took a lot out of me since we originally agreed on a set number of hours. Overall I made a good amount of money that summer but, I would say keeping my word is the main thing I could take away from this job.

Cody Smith

says:

I worked with kids for a year teaching them how to rock climb, there is something special about showing kids that share similar interests more about the sport that you love! I think you clicked so well with the Hockey Pro Shop because you shared the same values with them; sharing knowledge about the sport you love with other people. Also, I think that’s a good point that you are more satisfied with your Hockey Pro Shop job because you felt heard and cared for by the management as opposed to the moving company. When management cares for your well-being it leads to a more satisfying work environment.

arbankston

arbankston

says:

The position I held the longest lasted five years at my hometown’s local dental clinic. I was hired under a director that ended up moving after my first year and the person that filled the position as the new dental director was one of the dentists that trained me when I first started. I had a positive relationship with her as my mentor and she knew me well – knowing I am versatile, love to learn and be challenged. Although I was hired as a dental assistant, the projects I worked on varied greatly throughout the dental clinic. I was learning the different areas and, in the end, came out with a greater understanding of what it takes to run a dental clinic. I was incredibly satisfied and look to that as a good understanding of how I could manage my own employees in the future.

I think management will have satisfied employees when they know their strengths and weaknesses. That way, they can manage them knowing where each individual does well and eventually be able to help them grow in areas the employee is ready to work on. And when you have employees trained in various areas so that they have a little experience, you can place them in the areas in which are needing a little more help or a position to fill.

abconstable

says:

I actually worked as a temporary dental assistant myself back in high school. My mom had worked for the dentist office for years and they were just looking for someone to fill in temporarily while a permanent worker was away due to having surgery. My experience was a lot like yours, although short lived. I really enjoyed the job and was presented with a lot of versatility. Each day was something new, yet enough of the same to where I was able to learn thoroughly.

Do you still work at the dentist office? If not, do you think you will ever go back and try to run your own clinic? I think it would be hard work but with the right skill set it could be very rewarding. It’s good to hear you had such a positive experience working there.

kveech2

kveech2

says:

I completely agree with that part that you said about people knowing their strengths and weaknesses. I believe as a manager it’s important to know the strengths and weaknesses of your employees so that you can pair them properly and they can learn from each other. I also work in a dental office as a dental assistant and had the same experience of being able to learn and gain exposure to more aspects of the job than just the dental assisting side to it. Learning about the complexity of insurance was the largest challenge that I had but once I was able to grasp the concepts I was much more valuable to my coworkers. Also learning from a person who believes in your ability to learn and is willing to spend time teaching you is so valuable.

alhansen6

says:

Arbankston,
For some reason I am terrified of the dentist office! I have always had a nervous feeling as a kid going to dentist, and the feeling never went away as I got older. It seems like you’ve had this job for a few years and got to learn all of the different aspects of your position.

To me, having a good relationship with your supervisor is a necessity, because it can not only improve work performance but also creates an easier work environment. Luckily, in all of my positions I’ve worked, I have had very little problems with my bosses.

rjburns2

rjburns2

says:

Hello Professor and class,
I have chose the following question to respond to this for this weeks class discussion:

2.Describe a job you have held in which you were very dissatisfied and had a poor attitude about your work. What factors caused you to be dissatisfied and what could management have done to increase your job satisfaction?

I have always placed a high value on job satisfaction and found the most important factor determining that job satisfaction (or lack there of) is respect. I have a very hard time being productive when I feel disrespected and I believe most people feel the same. The most dissatisfied I have ever been with a job was on my last deployment, while I was still enlisted. I was a technician in the navy; my job was basically to troubleshoot/repair, replace and maintain the radar and communications systems on the aircraft for my squadron. The working conditions were pretty bad on my last deployment and my Master chief was being faced with budget cuts, so he decided to stop giving my shop Flight Deck Pay. His justification being that their wasn’t enough money in the budget to give it to everyone that worked on the flight deck. This was a lie because I knew for a fact at the time that everyone of our admin were getting flight deck pay, even though they never worked on the flight deck (didn’t even have the proper protective equipment to be allowed on it.). My Master chief (manager) had decided that his buddies in admin were worth man than the people in my shop who were actually entitled. I was furious with him and my behavior towards him and admin reflected it.
I think the best thing management could have done, would have been to stand up for what is right and ensure that everyone who is entitled to pay, receives it. If i hadn’t stood up for myself, I wouldn’t have received anything. It is important that workers feel respected.

Joshua Counts

says:

Being in the military as well I understand where you are coming from. The military has some of the best possible examples of leadership and developing good leaders. I have also had a couple of examples of terrible leaders in the military. Unlike civilian employment, you can not resign, be moved to a different office, change supervisors, refuse to work, or any other way to avoid the supervisor. I have found most of the time supervisors are never disciplined unless it is a case of sexual harassment or assault. But this is how the military operates and the support of promoting and developing leaders should always be recognized.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Pay is important, but studies show (as you pointed out), that most employees would rather have honest, respectful and appreciative supervisors.

Erin Kitchin

Erin Kitchin

says:

I have only worked a few jobs over the past couple of years. I started working when I was 16 and obtained the basic part-time jobs. It wasn’t until I turned 19, did I find myself in a full-time position. Though every job was different, I found myself to enjoy all the work which I did. My first job was as a cafe waitress/cook at my local bowling alley. The second, a clean team member for the local gym. The third, an administrative assistant for my academic advisor. Finally, my current job as a full-time firefighter. These jobs had little to nothing in common, but I look back and find myself having enjoyed every position. The common denominator that these jobs all had in common was my ability to build meaningful relationships.

The job descriptions themselves were not glorious, even as a firefighter there can be some really unfavorable tasks. What kept me coming into work, and still does is the excitement brought when I get to see my co-workers, and after soon enough, friends. This factor is not something a supervisor can have a lot of control over, but it’s an environment that they can help foster. Even with poor supervisors, do people come together. As a supervisor, and has been lead under some incredibly great ones, I would hope to help build the relationships in the workplace. I’d like to help encourage off shift bonding and team-oriented tasks that really allow people to get to know each other.

ilukulay

says:

Describe a job you have held in which you were very dissatisfied and had a poor attitude about your work. What factors caused you to be dissatisfied and what could management have done to increase your job satisfaction?

My job working at six flags was very dissatisfying mainly because of management. Initially, it was very good. I was happy working as a cashier, meeting new people and all of my co-workers had a good relationship with each other . Since we were serving hundreds of customers daily, it was always busy which i liked because it made the day go by faster.

The problem began when appliances that were required for us to do our jobs became damaged. We informed the management promptly of our working situation but due to lack of proper communication within the upper management team our request was never received by the proper department. This made our job a living hell over the next couple months. Customers were always angry at us and this brought unrest among the employees . I was less incline to work because i felt no one cared.

I think proper communication is key especially in large companies. Management could improve training among managers of various department to have a better interdepartmental co-ordination. This can hugely improve job satisfaction.

abconstable

says:

1. Describe a job you have held in which you were very satisfied and had a good attitude about your work. What factors caused you to be so satisfied and happy? How will you use (or how have you used) this experience as a supervisor?

I don’t have too much to complain about in the job I currently have. I am a Claims Technician at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois but I work through Texas. The job is very much a desk job in which I’m on my computer all day. For me, being active and healthy is a very important part of my lifestyle, but the company I work for acknowledges that and presents employees opportunities. There is a gym in our work building which we are free to use any time of the day. I just think it’s a great perk to have at work and especially since we are a health insurance company, so we should all strive to be as healthy as possible.

Another great perk about my job is that our supervisors do not micro-manage which I find very appealing. Being scrutinized makes me very nervous at work and being able to work independently will ensure that my work is much more thought out and of better quality. We are trusted to do our jobs and I think that shows respect towards employees. We also get to choose the shift that we work. We can come in anywhere between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. to put our 8 hours in. This is wonderful as people have more of an opportunity to plan work around other things rather than planning other things around work. It’s great to work for a company who respects that we are adults and the majority of us are all responsible and can be trusted to do our work with so much freedom.

In the future, I plan on using this type of “hands-off” approach, if you will. I think it builds a respective relationship between an employee and his or her supervisor. The employee feels trusted while in turn the supervisor can trust that the job will be handled accordingly without having to micro-manage. Also, if any of my employees are interested in advancement and versatility, I would do everything in my power to help them grow and expand their knowledge. My employer is very open about trying to get people into the positions they want if requested. No one should have to be stuck in a company where they grow bored of their job. Being able to have something new to look forward to certainly makes the day better.

Joshua Counts

says:

Describe a job you have held in which you were very satisfied and had a good attitude about your work. What factors caused you to be so satisfied and happy? How will you use (or how have you used) this experience as a supervisor?

The best job I ever had was when I worked for the Cleveland Clinic Main Campus on their Medical Emergency Response Team (MERT) as an EMT. I loved this job because it worked well with my schedule when I was in paramedic school. I worked 12 hour shifts, three days a week. My hours were 7pm to 7am but we had bunk beds and I was able to sleep for half the night as calls were not as frequent at night. I was on a two man crew, a paramedic and an EMT and we were supplemented by the various code teams stationed throughout the different buildings of the hospital which had a physician, resident physician, nurse and a respiratory therapist. Our job was to respond to the codes, help stabilize the patient and then transport the patient to the emergency room. Unfortunately, I had to leave this job because I got my paramedic license and there were no paramedic openings so I had to go back on the transport truck.

I will use this experience when I am a supervisor primarily because I really never saw my supervisor. He would check on us and make sure everything was running smoothly. Employee satisfaction was very high so few poor actions occurred. There were not very many sick call-offs or occurrences of tardiness. Even if a mistake or lapse of judgement took place, the supervisor treated us like adults and the problem typically was not repeated and did not result in a write up. The quality control manager was typically causing problems for us and the supervisor would always have our backs and would act in our best interest in these cases.

I really miss this job and wish I could have continued in the position but life had other cards in the deck for me.

Alden

Alden

says:

Option 1:

One of the jobs I have held in the past that was very satisfying to me was in lawn service, while I was in California. I had this job for roughly three years during high school. It mainly consisted of mowing lawns and planting things like hedges and trees. I thoroughly enjoyed this job because it was very easygoing and worked well with my schedule, allowing me to work during school without a noticeable impact on my schoolwork.

While the job was not very long hours, it was decent work and earned enough for me to be happy with the time spent. One of the best parts of the job was the ability to choose when I wanted to do the work. The clients would pick either Saturday or Sunday and then I would be able to show up in a time frame that worked best for me. While being flexible, this required me to pick a time and be motivated to show up without being told what time to do so. This experience taught me how to be self-motivated and self-directed which would be very beneficial as a supervisor. Being self-motivated is a key part of being a supervisor in that while you are there to motivate the people under you, somehow you need to be motivated as well.

rjburns2

rjburns2

says:

Hello Alden,
I never really considered how satisfying servicing lawns could be but you make a good case for it here with the whole ‘flexible hours’ aspect. I could definitely see how it would be satisfying to work with my hands outside. I could also see how it would be a challenge at times to be motivated to work with my hands outside on the weekend. Thank you for sharing, I look forward to reading more in the future.

hjmoyle

hjmoyle

says:

My second job I had was for environmental restoration, which involved lawn care services for city buildings, high schools, gardens, and grave yards. I really loved working outside. It was enjoyable for me because it was simply and relaxing. I usually trained high schools to help out. Most days, I was the only “supervisor” at a site, so I had to step up and motivate my young crew. Sometimes it was hard not to get caught up in shenanigans. I wish I was more self motivated during those years. It is a good skill to have and it can help you with any job you pursue.

brlund2

says:

Response to question 1:
I have been employed as a bank teller, a finish carpenter, a paper boy, and a US Army soldier- all of which had their own set of perks and drawbacks, as can be expected. Specifically from my time serving in the military, I could easily answer either of these questions. In serving with four different units, and working with multiple other units regularly from The Marines, Air Force, and Special Operations Forces, it became quite evident that culture and attitude of a unit, especially from the top down, could significantly impact a soldier’s (airman’s, marines’, etc.) morale and job satisfaction.
My first duty station and position was at Fort Irwin National Training Center in California.
There are so many setbacks about the base and being employed there- it is an extremely small base with minimal amenities (besides training space), just south of Death Valley National Park, off the I-15 Interstate directly between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. While that may sound wonderful, we worked about 27 days per month and were constantly in field environment, rarely able to enjoy the proximity of those two great cities.
That said, my job, in which I basically played an acting role as a member of enemy forces, allowed me to train deploying units by “shooting” them and “blowing up” their vehicles, among many other quite fun roles. There was also a very laid back atmosphere in my unit and my platoon was very close- something of a mandate given the isolation of the base. The enjoyment of the job combined with the positive, close, and friendly relationships we shared, made my opportunity and position difficult to compare to anything I’ve ever been a part of. These circumstances resulted in very high job satisfaction and positive attitudes almost completely across our unit towards the mission and the day-to-day grind, despite the less-than ideal living conditions. I brought that attitude and positivity with me to every unit thereafter, and my attitude was noticeably contagious throughout my career. There were definitely some trying times during my service, but that first position and unit will always stick with me as one of the best work environments I may ever get to enjoy.

kveech2

kveech2

says:

The job I have during the summer time as a dental assistant has been my most enjoyable job so far. I love working there so much that often times I go back to help out where I can during my short visits to Anchorage. The aspects of this job that make it so enjoyable are a compilation of the job being the right fit for me and my interests, as well as being surrounded by supportive people in a good environment.

First, I think that it is very important to be in a job that is a good fit for you. I am pursuing a career as an orthodontics, so working in the dental field where I have the opportunity to learn about things I am interested in and passionate about is a great fit. The other aspect of the job is that I am constantly challenged and learning new skills, being in a job where I am not challenged can make me feel useless and that my superiors don’t have faith in my abilities. The last part of the job that makes it so enjoyable is that I am surrounded by hard-working and supportive people. Being part of a team that is made up of people who are all working towards the same goal makes a big difference in the environment at work. I spend a minimum of 40 hours a week with my co-workers, so it’s very important to me to be surrounded by positive people who respect one another. These 3 aspects will be the foundation that I will use when building my team as a small business owner.

Alden

Alden

says:

Hello,
Feeling well placed in a job is always great, and I would imagine even more so in the fact that you are pursuing a career in the same area. I would definitely agree that it is always important to be in a job that is right for you, but sometimes having a job that might not fit you at first can change your mind or even push you in a different direction altogether. I wish you well with putting together your small business.

Hailey Moyle

says:

I enjoy working as a waitress. I didn’t think that I would enjoy talking to people because I’m shy and I would rather work behind the scenes, but it has helped me relax and become a better communicator. While training as a waitress, customers and coworkers were kind and patient with me. By cooking only, I would never have gotten to know my customers. Now, when I see their cars pull up, I get their drinks and orders ready because I know what they get and how they like it. I like the old -fashion demeanor the restaurant portrays. We operate in a location where there is no cell service and the train goes around ten to signal that the bar is closing. I like the simplicity and repetitive nature, it makes work less stressful. My grandma would say, “It is so simple even a trained monkey could do it.”
There are many aspects I would like to incorporate into my next job. For example, my manager pushed me out of my comfort zone. Sometimes people are their own worst enemy and that was the case for me. By encouraging me to do something different I improved my skill set and became more valuable to the company because I could perform all the tasks at the establishment. I have a great relationship with my coworkers. I think being friendly and having an open line of communication helps greatly. As one of the more senior employees, I help train other employees and I encourage them to ask questions. Faking it until you make it can only get you so far, its better to learn now than explain why you are messing up later. Simply treating people with respect and dignity is something I strive for. I’ve seen people embarrass their coworkers or cause a scene and it make them look bad and creates a hostile work environment.

Ultimately, it is a fun experience and I’ll miss it once I start my professional career.

hjmoyle

hjmoyle

says:

I enjoy working as a waitress. I didn’t think that I would enjoy talking to people because I’m shy and I would rather work behind the scenes, but it has helped me relax and become a better communicator. While training as a waitress, customers and coworkers were kind and patient with me. By cooking only, I would never have gotten to know my customers. Now, when I see their cars pull up, I get their drinks and orders ready because I know what they get and how they like it. I like the old-fashion demeanor the restaurant portrays. We operate in a location where there is no cell service and the train goes around ten to signal that the bar is closing. I like the simplicity and repetitive nature, it makes work less stressful. My grandma would say, “It is so simple even a trained monkey could do it.”

There are many aspects I would like to incorporate into my next job. For example, my manager pushed me out of my comfort zone. Sometimes people are their own worst enemy and that was the case for me. By encouraging me to do something different I improved my skill set and became more valuable to the company because I could perform all the tasks at the establishment. I have a great relationship with my coworkers. I think being friendly and having an open line of communication helps greatly. As one of the more senior employees, I help train other employees and I encourage them to ask questions. Faking it until you make it can only get you so far, its better to learn now than explain why you are messing up later. Simply treating people with respect and dignity is something I strive for. I’ve seen people embarrass their coworkers or cause a scene and it make them look bad and creates a hostile work environment.

Ultimately, it is a fun experience and I’ll miss it once I start my professional career.

jpetersen3

says:

1. I tend to try to have a positive attitude a majority of the time, especially while at work. Jobs that have been the most satisfying are jobs where I feel as though I actually am accomplishing something and making a difference. The jobs in which I feel like happier are job where I feel as though my work is appreciated. I also like jobs where the supervisor treats you as a equal person and does not treat you like a second class citizen. When I have been given supervisor duties I remember to treat the people who are working for me as though they are appreciated for the work they do and that they are not below me. One thing I have learned is that everybody in the team is essential and you need everyone as much as they need you. One other thing that I find very important is that a leader needs to show his or her subordinates that they are willing to help and do the same work they order you to do. It brings up morale and make every job seem more important to everyone.
2.Unfortunately one of the jobs where the morale was low at times was at certain points while I was in the military. Don’t get me wrong there were many great and respectable leaders. However, there were some what we call “toxic” leaders that did not treat people like adults and respect them as a person like they should be treated. These were the times that made me and others unhappy. This is what I try to remember when I am in charge so I act very different than these types of leaders.

mswalker

mswalker

says:

Being a helicopter pilot for the US Army was my favorite job. I was satisfied with this job because of the challenges it offered. No day or flight was ever the same. The risk of the job often gave a sort of exhilarating high. Before I became a pilot, I was senior enlisted in the Marine Corps. Transferring to the Army, while becoming an officer, I was lower on the totem pole. I had to start over working my way up to earn respect all over again. This involved becoming a pilot in command ahead of my peers. While a pilot in command, I was in charge of all operations of the aircraft, often times being the lead of multiple aircraft on mission while deployed.

While being a pilot was my favorite job, being in the Army was my least favorite. Being a pilot was one percent of my duties. There was a lot of administrative tasks that were unrelated to being a pilot. The message was, “You’re a Warrant Officer, we can use you for whatever we want”. The message should have been, “You’re a pilot. We want you to be the best pilot you can be.”

jpetersen3

says:

Yes, I totally agree. While I was in the Army I only actually did my job or trained in my job about 5% of the time. While I was good at doing tasks we did on a daily basis I do not feel as though I was well trained in my MOS due to never actually doing the job. It was very frustrating.

Stephanie Nelson

Stephanie Nelson

says:

Currently, I have been employed with an Aviation Service Company for little over a year now as an Office specialist. The company is locally owned and operated by 10 employees & two dog greeters. The owners, who are husband and wife have operated the company for 30+ years together. As a full-time student year around, the owners agreed to work with my schedule, while I complete my last year of school. Through the years they have created this welcoming environment with their employees and customers. Where I wake every morning looking forward to 7:30 coffee talks around the lunchroom table with my fellow co-workers. We have become a small family, we support each other, push each other, aspire one another and listen to each other. I have learned what it takes to run a business and the day to day functions of a manager.

From my experience with the company, the owners are loyal to their employees, customers, and vendors. As a supervisor, engaging with your employees builds trust, communication and establishes responsibilities. A supervisor that shows pride towards what they do and loyalty to the company are good attributes for employees to have. Conducting employee meetings to understand what doesn’t work and what works more efficiently for operations. Allows for opinions from employees’ to be heard and would be valued through discussions. I plan to make a point to use these attributes once I have reached a management position.

John Schnering

says:

A family environment is very important for a workplace. When I worked my job over the summer, I knew everyone I worked with because we’ve competed against each other during the competitive rifle season. It took a week or two but after that I felt like I was around family. Once I felt comfortable, my efficiency at work skyrocketed. I was able to help the kids and if needed, ask one of my co-workers for help.
A supervisor who shows they love their job is important to a high job satisfaction. It correlates with how your attitude is when around others. Their mood depicts how you will be at work during the day.

rcskieens

says:

The first job experience that comes to mind is when I was an assistant for a business that had a variety of tasks that I would be asked to complete. This job pertained to septic tank replacement and locating lines by excavating. It ranged from spreading topsoil around after a job was complete to running an operation where it would be just me or a few people with myself being in charge. Although this would not be considered one of the most glamorous jobs it has stuck with me for how a business should be ran. The owner of the business was not afraid to put in the work and get the job done. From watching my employer work hard and put their trust in me, I learned from them and wanted to do the best I could to match their performance. The main factors that left me feeling satisfied with this job was how we had an emphasis of a team. We had conversations as if we were all the same rank and built off of each other’s ideas. I believe that I will use this experience in a supervisor role by being open to other people’s ideas and with leading by example.

A job that comes to mind in relation to being dissatisfied relates to an occupation where I was tasked with crack sealing and seal coating drive ways. I was responsible for much more than just the before mentioned such as leading a small team and completing whole jobs by myself. Since the employer did not want to pay overtime, they refused to hire more than three employees at a time. This meant very long days, but that was not the problem. My boss would only show up for a short amount of time to work and would then leave and have most of the day off. On top of that they abused my position and work ethic by hiring on someone less qualified at a higher rate that I was required to train. From a management perspective, I don’t necessarily believe that the owner of the business needs to put a full day of work in, but in this circumstance with very low manning it was reasonable to put more hours in. My solution to this, which I voiced, was to increase staffing so that two shifts could be pulled for each day. The morning eight-hour shift cleans the drive ways and preps everything to get seal coated. Then the afternoon shift comes in and seal coats the houses. Since there would be more than three employees with this method overtime would be required, but hours could be managed to a 40-hour work week instead of more than 70-hour work weeks like I was working. I later found out that my employer took my advice and switched to this system. The other thing that my employer could have done to increase my job satisfaction would have to be fair and reasonable with me in reference to pay and seniority. I had been there longer than a brand-new employee and I was already getting paid 25% less than them. In the view of management, it would have been in their best interest to have given me a raise to build loyalty with the company. Overall, I believe if the employee feels valued then they will bring more to the table each day and conduct a better job.

kaariola

says:

I am currently working at the Wood Center as an event coordinator as well as a bartender at the Pub. I’ve been an event coordinator for the W.C. now for 2 years and a bartender for 2 semesters. I find both jobs satisfying and worth waking up in the morning for. Working as an event coordinator I get to work with a number of departments around campus, which lets me get connected with a variety of people allowing me to develop professional relationships. I also get to supervise student workers, which lets me work on my leadership skills in a workplace setting. I enjoy the responsibilities as well as enjoy the experience learning how to supervise others. One challenging aspect to the job I experienced early on was learning how to evenly delegate work to the students I supervise. It took time to learn but I think it’s an important skill to know if I want to be a manager in the future.

With that, I realize that I can fine-tune certain aspects in my position. Recently, I’ve had more responsibilities added to my plate, which means that I’ll have to delegate more work to the students I supervise. I’d like to take this learning experience and use it for future jobs. One thing I would like to be better at is to be better at motivating workers. I think it’s an important skill to know not only as a supervisor but in general a leader.

Stephanie Nelson

Stephanie Nelson

says:

That’s awesome to hear that your building professional connections, and skills of a supervisor through your job with the University! Learning how to delegate can be challenging because you don’t want to micromanage your team and rather allow them to prove their capable of handling such tasks. With your positive job satisfaction with what you do, I cannot image that you create a welcoming environment for your team.

Alan

Alan

says:

In 2014 I transitioned from a laborer position to an operations department position within my organization. I was selected based on a recommendation from a friend and the position was usually occupied by senior employees, so I was initially honored to be selected. That honor was short lived. The position was in a windowless, open-secret-storage building. For anyone unfamiliar with open-secret-storage, it is a key-card accessed building with no electronics allowed i.e. iPhone, fitbits.
The job was mostly paperwork and the workload fairly light. This left lots of free time to do, well, nothing. I would ask for additional work but it either did not exist or it was already delegated to someone else. I spent the majority of my time taking slow walks to the water fountain, reorganizing sugar packets in the breakroom, and rearranging bulletin boards in hopes someone would notice (no one ever noticed).
Eventually the monotony got the better of me. My passion for my job deteriorated and that is what ultimately drove my decision to leave the military and go back to school. In a way it may have been the best job I ever had because it forced me to make the best decision I have made thus far.
Had management found a way to task me with more responsibilities and possibly find me a desk that didn’t fold in the middle for easy picnicking, I may have stuck around longer. A natural light source may have done the trick as well. A human can only tolerate so many hours of fluorescent light before they break. The constant chatter of FOXNEWS on the TV two feet above my desk is probably the straw that broke the camel’s back. All these issues were brought to management’s attention, but nothing ever changed. Now there is someone else aimlessly wandering those halls.

tpstickel

tpstickel

says:

Variety is the spice of life and the spice of work. Most of us enjoy a position that is not only challenging, but also provides work or environment change.

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